The “Who” of Earning More

While we’ve all read the articles about the gender pay-gap in the US, I’d like to discuss why it’s important that women start earning more and provide one perspective on how we can go about doing that.

First I’d like to mention that despite earning more college degrees than men, and now, more advanced college degrees, women still make on average 27% less than their male counterparts. That’s a glaring disconnect and it’s significant considering that most women outlive men by roughly five years in the U.S. We’re also the sole or primary source of income for 40% of households with children. That’s up from only 11% in 1960. Thus, a higher income in our working years is crucial if we want to adequately provide for both our children’s and our futures.

While it’s clear the female gender has the intelligence and discipline to master higher education, what isn’t clear is why we don’t reach the same levels of success in the workplace. I can’t claim to know the answer for all women, but I can speak from my own experience. As the first of my sisters to go to college I had little guidance. Fortunately, once I learned the system, established good study habits, and got clear about why I wanted a degree, I started to excel. In college, succeeding meant knowing the material, acing tests, and generally holding myself accountable. I didn’t necessarily need strong interpersonal skills or external confidence. I simply needed to know the subject matter and master tests and assignments.

My first job in finance was a very different experience. In comparison to school, the working world – particularly in the male-dominated world of finance – was much more about confidence, speaking up, and did I mention confidence? Yes, intelligence and a job well-done were important, but I noticed that those who had the confidence to take on challenging projects, talk to the executives with ease, and court clients with swagger seemed to get ahead. Interestingly, I had this confidence outside of work, but in the office my voice cracked, my brain froze up at inopportune times, and my words were often awkward. It was doubly painful to watch myself make blunder upon blunder, all the while knowing that in other environments I was relaxed, confident, capable – in a word, myself. What was happening? Where did I go?

It’s been twelve years since landing my first financial job and since that time my confidence has grown. I believe the biggest contributors to bridging the gap between the outside-work me and the at-work me were awareness, compassion, and trust. Although at times I felt insecure, incapable, and frustrated on the job in those early years, having awareness of the confident, capable version of myself was an important touchstone in the office. It allowed me to notice what triggered my nerves or caused my thoughts to freeze up, instead of believing that that was who I was. With awareness, I could proactively prepare for those moments, give myself a break when I did have a blunder, and trust that in time, I would grow more confident. It wasn’t always easy, but having an image of who I wanted to be at the office spurred me on. So did identifying role models at work, both male and female, and reaching out to those people. Knowing where I wanted to go, what that looked like, and most importantly, who I wanted to be at work were my guideposts.

There were certainly bumps along the way, including raises that were not granted, wrong career turns, and staying in some positions for too long. Despite the setbacks and challenges, I remained focused on my “who” at work and had a willingness, and perhaps a penchant for embarrassing blunders. Money was important to me, and although I aspired to grow my income, it wasn’t my main focus. Surprisingly, my commitment to being more myself and a willingness to work with new, uncomfortable situations had the happy side-effect of promotions and pay raises.

Money is important. Considering that we women often outlive men and are shouldering more and more responsibility for our dependents and ourselves, it’s even more important. The good news is that while money is not always our first priority, from my experience, it doesn’t have to be. A commitment to being more fully ourselves in any environment and a willingness to stretch ourselves with uncomfortable, yet meaningful challenges frequently has the happy side-effect of higher earnings.

Regardless, becoming more fully ourselves brings with it the capacity to weather any financial situation and is, in the end, its own reward.

Carrie Tallman, CFA

Director of Research

?????????????????????????????????????????????

Share this:

The Rational Investor… or Not?

This is the last post in a series of six blog entries focused on topics that might be of interest to the Millennial generation. If you would like to see our attempt at making these subject matters entertaining, visit our YouTube page to see a video version of this article.

 

So here’s the setup: you have two large pizzas. One is cut into four pieces, the other is cut into eight pieces. Would you rather have one piece from the former, or two pieces from the latter? If you asked a hungry four-year-old that question, he’d probably be totally confused because you used the words “former” and “latter.” But then he’d go for the 2 pieces because in his mind, two pieces are more than one. Of course, anyone with a basic knowledge of fractions knows this is a trick question, because it’s the same amount.

Let’s imagine now that the pizzas are companies, and the pieces are shares of stock in those companies. You have $1000 to invest. Company A’s stock price is $50, and company B’s stock price is $100. Assuming that there are no trading costs, you can purchase 20 shares of company A and 10 shares of company B. All else equal, which would you buy? Answer: it doesn’t matter – your investment in either company is the same. You’d be surprised at how many people would choose company A because you get “more” shares of stock or because they think the shares are a better “value” by virtue of having a lower price per share. The thing you have to realize is this – a company can issue any number of shares it wants to. If the price per share is $100 they can issue a 2-for-1 split, and now you’ll have 2 shares worth $50 each for every one you had before. Your total dollar investment in the company doesn’t change, though.

We all want to believe we are rational and that emotions are only something that affect other people, but it just isn’t true. We all have made mistakes like the investor in the example above and that’s why behavioral finance is one of the fastest-growing branches of psychology. This is just one example of common investor misconceptions but there are many more – click on the link above for a lighthearted look at a few that we see from time to time. Remember to always discuss your investment decisions with your advisor, so that he or she can lead you in the direction of the logical and unbiased choice.

Sarah DerGarabedian, CFA
Portfolio Manager

???????????????????

 

Share this: