(Tax loss) Harvest Season is Almost Here!

The kids are back in school, the leaves are changing colors, and pumpkin spice lattes – the age-old harbingers of harvest season – are everywhere. At Parsec, we are preparing for the harvest…of tax losses.

Every year, beginning in late October/early November, Parsec’s portfolio managers will scour clients’ taxable accounts for meaningful losses, which we can use to offset realized gains created from trading throughout the year. These tax-efficient trading strategies provide value to clients by minimizing their tax burden while keeping the portfolio aligned with their financial planning goals.

You might see trades from one security into another one that is similar, but not exactly the same – we do this so that you can recognize a loss while maintaining exposure to the same industry or sector, yet avoid incurring a wash sale. According to IRS publication 550, “a wash sale occurs when you sell or trade stock or securities at a loss and within 30 days before or after the sale, you buy substantially identical stock or securities,” either in the same account or in another household account, including IRAs and Roth IRAs. Stocks of different companies in the same industry are not considered “substantially identical,” nor are ETFs that track the same sector but are managed by different companies (like a Vanguard Emerging Markets ETF vs. an iShares Emerging Markets ETF).

Sometimes it makes sense to place a loss-harvesting trade and leave the proceeds in cash for 31 days, then repurchase the same security. We may do this for clients who have cash needs during the holiday season, with the intention of placing rebalancing trades in January when there is no more need for liquidity. When liquidity is not an issue, however, we prefer to keep the funds fully invested in another high-quality name. We may later choose to reverse the trade, once the wash sale period has expired, or we may leave the trade in place if we think it is appropriate and suits the clients’ needs.

Sarah DerGarabedian, CFA
Director of Portfolio Management

 

Share this:

Time to Update your Estate Plan?

Now that we have started a new year, it’s a good time for many of us to stop putting off getting an estate plan created or updated.

Under current tax law, most people do not have a concern with estate tax.  The current Federal estate tax exemption is $5.49 million per person. If properly elected, any unused exemption is portable between spouses.  Therefore, a married couple with an estate of $10.98 million or below could pass their entire estate to heirs without any Federal estate tax liability.

While much attention is focused on the tax aspects, estate planning is more a matter of organizing and simplifying your affairs so that your heirs are not burdened with additional stress at the same time they are grieving for the loss of a loved one. We recommend that you engage the services of a qualified attorney to guide you and create the appropriate documents.

Your estate plan should include a will and possibly living or revocable trusts. Advanced directives and incapacity planning are other items that are typically addressed as part of your estate plan. This includes having documents prepared such as a durable power of attorney, health care power of attorney and living will.

As part of your estate plan, you should review your beneficiary designations. By filling out a beneficiary designation form, individuals can bypass the probate process and pass specific assets upon their death directly to their heirs. Many types of assets such as IRAs, qualified retirement plans, life insurance policies and commercial annuities pass via beneficiary designation rather than through your will. In addition, beneficiary designations can be added to taxable investment accounts (known as Transfer on Death or “TOD”) and bank accounts (known as Payable on Death or “POD”). Note that while the assets passing by beneficiary designation bypass the probate process, they are still included as part of the decedent’s estate for calculating any potential estate tax liability.

There is talk that the estate tax may be changed or even eliminated this year. For most people that shouldn’t be a deterrent to getting their estate plan done, since few are affected by the estate tax in the first place. Having an updated estate plan gives you peace of mind and helps prevent additional stress on your heirs. Once you have a plan in place, it can always be modified as tax laws and your personal circumstances change.

William S. Hansen, CFA
President
Chief Investment Officer

bill

Share this:

2016 IRA Contribution Rules

The deadline to make IRA contributions for tax year 2016 is April, 18 2017. The maximum contribution is $5,500 per individual ($6,500 if age 50 or over) or 100 percent of earned income, whichever is less.

There are income limits which determine whether you can deduct your Traditional IRA contribution or if you qualify to make a Roth contribution. The following table gives the phase-out range for the most common circumstances.

Do you qualify to deduct your Traditional IRA contribution?
If your income is less than the beginning of the phase-out range, you qualify. If your income is over the phase-out range, you do not. If your income falls inside the range, you partially qualify.

Modified Adjusted Gross Income Phase-Out Range
Tax Filing Status For 2016 Contributions For 2017 Contributions
Single, participates in an employer-sponsored retirement plan: $61,000 – $71,000 $62,000 – $72,000
Married filing jointly, participates in an employer-sponsored retirement plan: $98,000 – $118,000 $99,000 – $119,000
Married filing jointly, your spouse participates in an employer-sponsored retirement plan, but you do not: $184,000 – $194,000 $186,000 – $196,000

Do you qualify to contribute to a Roth IRA?

Modified Adjusted Gross Income Phase-Out Range – Roth
Tax Filing Status For 2016 Contributions For 2017 Contributions
Single: $117,000-$132,000 $118,000-$132,999
Married, filing jointly: $184,000-$194,000 $186,000-$195,999

If your filing status differs from those listed above, please contact your advisor and he or she can help you determine whether you qualify.

Harli Palme, CFA, CFP®
Partner

Harli Palme

Share this:

The Perfect Gift? Ideas…From a Planning Perspective

December is here and 2016 is drawing to a close.  As we enter the holiday season, we scramble to pick the perfect gift for our family members, our friends, teachers… the list goes on.

At Parsec, we work with clients to create gifting strategies that fit into their overall financial plan.

This December we encourage you to think about giving and its potential longer term impact on both your family (children and grandchildren) and your taxes.  Let’s first review a powerful gifting strategy to younger family members: the custodial Roth IRA.

As long as there is earned income, which can come from mowing lawns, housework, babysitting etc., contributions to a custodial Roth IRA can be made up to the amount of the earned income but not over $5,500*.  For example, your 9 year old grandchild earned $1,000 over the summer through his lawn mowing business.  You can open a custodial Roth IRA for him and deposit a matching gift of $1,000. Let’s say he continues to mow lawns each summer for the next 10 years and you continue to match his earnings with a $1,000 holiday gift.  Assuming a 7% return each year, your gifts will grow to over $15,000 at the end of 10 years.  Remember this is only the beginning, the approximate $5,000 earnings in this example will continue to compound over time and ALL earnings are tax free upon withdrawal later in life.  Rewarding your grandchild’s hard work through Roth contributions is a holiday gift that offers valuable lessons on many levels.

Let’s switch gears to philanthropy.  Each year Parsec’s client service team processes hundreds of charitable gift requests from our clients.  These gifts of course offer tax advantages in various forms.  For many of our clients, the qualified charitable distribution or QCD brings the most formidable tax savings.  How does it work?  If you are over 70 1/2, up to $100,000 of your required minimum distribution (RMD) can be given directly to charity through a QCD.  The result: your AGI will be reduced dollar for dollar by the amount of the QCD.  A simple, yet impactful strategy:  on not only your charity of choice but also on your tax dollar.

As we enter this holiday season we hope that you reach out to your financial advisor to talk about gifting strategies that may be appropriate for you and your family.  Happy Holidays!

Betsy Cunagin, CFP®

Senior Financial Advisor

*$5,500 is the IRA contribution limit for 2016 and 2017.  

Share this:

Land Trust

Individuals who are large landowners often face challenges in planning their estates. The land may have a value that causes the estate to exceed the federal estate tax exclusion limit. Currently the limit is $5,450,000 per person. In many cases, the landowner may not want the land to be sold to cover estate taxes, but would rather see the land continue to be used as a farm, ranch, or preserved for its natural beauty. The landowner may want to consider a conservation easement.

A conservation easement is a voluntary legal agreement that benefits landowners and the public, as it protects land while leaving it in private ownership. The uses of the property are then limited to those uses that are consistent with the landowner’s and the conservation easement holder’s objectives. Conservation easements are individually tailored, but in general they benefit landowners by protecting the features of the property they wish to preserve. They potentially receive significant tax relief, and they maintain ownership of the land. The land provides public benefits by conserving open lands, farms, forests, and other natural resources.

The tax benefit to the landowner is realized at the time the conservation easement is placed on the land. The landowner basically sells the right to develop the land to a land trust. The value of the land for property tax purposes becomes the much lower highest and best use in conservation value. The conservation easement rides with the deed of the land, therefore the intent of the original owner for the use of the land is protected in perpetuity.

For our clients in southeastern North Carolina, the offices of Sandhills Area Land Trust (SALT) are located on Southwest Broad Street in Southern Pines, next door to Parsec’s Southern Pines office. They are a community-based, 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that works to preserve and protect land and its environs in Moore, Richmond, Scotland, Hoke, Cumberland, and Harnett counties.

SALT was founded in 1991. Since that time, it has worked with private landowners to negotiate conservation easements on their property, and more than 13,000 acres of working farms, water supplies, endangered ecosystems, and urban-space have been permanently protected. The North Carolina Sandhills is a region of rolling hills with sandy soil located between the Piedmont and the Coastal Plain. This area is home to the largest contiguous stands of long leaf pine forest in North Carolina, and many wetlands and dozens of rare plants and animals, which all need to be protected. With this goal in mind, SALT cultivates partnerships among landowners, local businesses and government agencies.

If you have any questions pertaining to the use of land conservation easements in your estate planning process, please contact your Parsec Financial Advisor.

Wendy S. Beaver, AAMS®

 

Share this:

2015 IRA Contribution Rules

The deadline to make IRA contributions for tax year 2015 is April, 15 2016. The maximum contribution is $5,500 per individual ($6,500 if age 50 or over) or 100 percent of earned income, whichever is less.

There are income limits which determine whether you can deduct your Traditional IRA contribution or if you qualify to make a Roth contribution. The following table gives the phase-out range for the most common circumstances.

Do you qualify to deduct your Traditional IRA contribution?
If your income is less than the beginning of the phase-out range, you qualify. If your income is over the phase-out range, you do not. If your income falls inside the range, you partially qualify.

Modified Adjusted Gross Income Phase-Out Range

Tax Filing Status For 2015 Contributions For 2016 Contributions
Single, participates in an employer-sponsored retirement plan: $61,000 – $71,000 $61,000 – $71,000
Married filing jointly, participates in an employer-sponsored retirement plan: $98,000 – $118,000 $98,000 – $118,000
Married filing jointly, your spouse participates in an employer-sponsored retirement plan, but you do not: $183,000 – $193,000 $184,000 – $194,000

Do you qualify to contribute to a Roth IRA for 2015?

Modified Adjusted Gross Income Phase-Out Range – Roth

Tax Filing Status For 2015 Contributions For 2016 Contributions
Single: $116,000-$131,000 $117,000-$132,000
Married, filing jointly: $183,000-$193,000 $184,000-$194,000

If your filing status differs from those listed above, please contact your advisor and he or she can help you determine whether you qualify.

Harli Palme, CFA, CFP®
Partner

???????????

Share this:

2014 IRA Contribution Rules

The deadline to make IRA contributions for tax year 2014 is April, 15 2015.  The maximum contribution is $5,500 of earned income or $6,500 for those 50 and over.   These amounts will stay the same in 2015.

There are income limits which determine whether you can deduct your Traditional IRA contribution or if you qualify to make a Roth contribution.  The following table gives the phase-out range for the most common circumstances.

Do you qualify to deduct your   Traditional IRA contribution?

If   your income is less than the beginning of the phase-out range, you qualify.  If your income is over the phase-out range, you do not.  If your income falls inside the range, you partially qualify.

Modified   Adjusted Gross   Income  Phase-Out   Range
Single,   participates in an employer-sponsored retirement plan: $61,000-$71,000
Married (filing jointly), participates in an employer-sponsored retirement plan: $98,000-$118,000
Married (filing jointly), your spouse participates in an employer-sponsored retirement plan, but you do not: $183,000-$193,000

Do you qualify to contribute   to a Roth IRA?

Single: $116,000-$131,000
Married, filing jointly: $183,000-$193,000

If your filing status differs from those listed above, please contact your advisor and he or she can help you determine whether you qualify.

Harli Palme, CFA, CFP®
Partner

???????????

Share this:

Taxable Income Reduction Strategies

As a trusted financial advisors for our clients, our priority is to stay apprised on current tax laws, as well as provide planning opportunities to reduce future tax liabilities. For many of our clients, their Traditional IRAs are also their largest tax liability. When an IRA is responsibly managed, the hope is that the account will continue growing until the owner’s late 70s. At that point in time, the mandatory withdrawals from the account may offset any capital appreciation and earnings on the account. When taking into account these growth expectations, as well as the client’s necessary cash flow, many clients find that the RMDs in their 80s will far exceed their necessary cash flow. These factors contribute to an increasing likelihood of the client having a higher tax rate later in life. Higher Modified Adjusted Gross Income(MAGI) is one concern that has a trickle down effect. When MAGI gets high enough, it can result in an income based adjustment for Medicare Part B and D. It should be clear by now that a healthy retirement can actually increase tax concerns.

So, by now you may be saying, “Thanks for the depressing news Daniel, I don’t think I want to read any further. ” I encourage you to keep reading.
 
Controlling Income

The first step in keeping MAGI low is controlling income. For retired individuals, there are two main sources of cash flow. The first being social security and pensions. These are fixed amounts that cannot be changed. The second source is income from personal assets. This includes brokerage accounts, Traditional IRAs, and Roth IRAs. A brokerage account is not a tax-deferred account. Therefore any income produced by the account will contribute to MAGI. It is possible to manipulate a brokerage account’s holdings to reduce taxable income. The second source of cash flow is withdrawals made from Traditional IRAs to supplement income or fulfill an RMD. These withdrawals are fully taxable to the individual. In addition to Traditional IRA withdrawals, Roth IRA withdrawals can be made, however, these withdrawals are not taxable to the individual if made after 59 ½. The IRS gives us tax tables, from these, we are able to determine the maximum amount of taxable income we want to produce for clients. As I said before, it may become impossible to keep income below this desired threshold when RMDs get larger and larger. If this is the case, we move on to advanced planning techniques.

 Image
Roth Conversions and Charitable Remainder Trusts 
One of our favorite techniques to reduce the impact of RMDs is to combine the benefits of a Roth IRA with a charitable gift. The establishment of a Charitable Remainder Trust may allow someone with charitable intentions for their estate to realize the benefit now. The Charitable Remainder Trust can provide a lifetime income stream for the donor, as well as provide a large charitable deduction. In this tandem planning technique, the charitable deduction can offset the income incurred from a Traditional to Roth conversion. The reduction in the size of the Traditional IRA will also truncate the amount of the RMD going forward.
 Image
This particular technique is just an example of some of the advanced planning options we evaluate with our clients. Every situation is different with special circumstances to consider. If you have any questions about these strategies, contact one of our advisors.
Share this:

North Carolina Tax Law Changes

After months of grappling with members of the state’s legislature, Governor Pat McCrory signed a bill authorizing the most significant changes to North Carolina’s tax code since the 1930s on July 15.

The new tax code reduces both personal and corporate income taxes and eliminates the estate tax. Early estimates indicate that taxpayers across the board will pay less in state taxes once the changes go into effect. Some of the other key provisions of the new law are:

• Deductions for mortgage interest on first homes will be capped at $20,000.
• Charitable contributions will remain fully deductible.
• The child tax credit will continue
• Social Security income will remain exempt from state taxes.
• The corporate tax rate will be cut from the current 6.9 percent to 5 percent by 2015.
• North Carolina’s gas tax will be capped until June 30, 2015.
• A deduction on retirement income is eliminated.
• Starting in 2014, the sales tax holidays for back-to-school and Energy Star products are eliminated.
• The deductibility of the first $50,000 of business income has been eliminated
• Service contracts will be subject to sales taxes
• Electricity will be taxed at a general sales tax rate of 7%
• Amusements, movie tickets, etc will be subject to sales taxes

This is only a small representation of the changes. And this information should not be considered tax advice. Individual situations may vary. And as always, please consult your tax advisor regarding how the laws may affect you.

Tracy H. Allen, CFP®
Financial Advisor

Share this:

The Fiscal Cliff, Taxes and Investment Decisions

This morning CNBC had a headline “Fending off the Fiscal Cliff”.  I turned off the TV.  You have to beware of headlines that create a sense of urgency to do something in your portfolio.

This sort of reporting promotes what I call the “I’ve got a feeling” trade.  This is when you take some action in your portfolio based on the mood of the day. Currently, there is a lot of focus on the Presidential election.  If you are concerned about the other candidate winning, keep in mind that someone is equally concerned about your candidate winning.  Don’t make investment decisions based on emotion.

Taxes can be a factor, but should not be the sole driver of an investment decision.  Tax planning for this year is particularly difficult due to the uncertainty of future tax rates.  The Bush tax cuts are set to expire on 12/31, which would cause the tax rate on qualified dividends to increase from a current maximum of 15% to as high as 39.6%, depending on your tax bracket.  We likely will not know anything on income tax, estate tax, alternative minimum tax, the possible return of the IRA charitable deduction for those over 70.5, etc. until after the election or even later in December.  It’s also possible that these tax rates could be finalized in the first quarter of 2013 and made retroactive to 12/31.

This year is unusual in that some of the usual rules of thumb about capital gains may not apply.  Typically, people want to delay paying taxes whenever possible.  However, you way want to realize some long-term capital gains in 2012 in order to lock in the 15% tax rate which will likely be higher next year.  In addition, capital gains rates are currently 0% for taxpayers who are in the 10% or 15% tax brackets based on their taxable income.  The 0% tax rate for these people also expires on 12/31/2012.

You may not want to realize capital gains early under certain circumstances.  For example, if you have investments that are highly appreciated and you are advanced in age or in poor health.  Depending on the size of your estate and what happens with estate tax law, the beneficiaries of these assets may receive a step-up in basis for all or a portion of the assets upon the taxpayer’s death.   Therefore, it wouldn’t make sense to sell assets and pay taxes on the gain when a step-up might be available in the near future.

We recommend that you avoid making major decisions or changes to your portfolio based on fears or possibilities that may or may not materialize. While some limited amount of portfolio rebalancing may make sense, you should discuss your particular situation with your Parsec advisor if you have questions.

Disclaimer:  we are not licensed CPAs and do not give tax advice.  We offer some general guidance with respect to the mechanics of tax issues, but we encourage you to consult with your CPA or a qualified tax professional before making any decisions or taking action.

Bill Hansen, CFA

Managing Partner

October 12, 2012

Share this: