Top 10 rules to a frugal life:

Those that know me well can vouch for the fact that I am a frugal person.  I feel that there is much that is virtuous about living a frugal life.  Learning about delayed gratification and the important limits to set upon our role in a consumption based economy is a great path to happiness and peace.  The famous economist and philosopher John Stuart Mill once said, “I have learned to seek my happiness by limiting my desires, rather than attempting to satisfy them.”  This simple phrase rings true to me.  This is especially evident as you stand witness to the constant bombardment of consumerism in our media and markets.  Take stock of what you have and the blessings of life and you might not fall prey to the treadmill of consumption that will always be tempting you.

Top 10 rules to a frugal life:

  1. Budget – know where your money goes.
  2. Be guarded against lifestyle inflation; try to keep income growing faster than expense growth.
  3. Don’t be wasteful. Consider gently used items when buying cars, and other depreciating assets.
  4. Find discounts whenever possible.
  5. Trips and vacations are about experiences, not necessarily lavish accommodations.
  6. Frugal people rarely eat out, preferring to prepare their own food.  I find it better and healthier, not to mention less costly.
  7. While there are many worthwhile private schools, there is a great value to be found in many of our public schools as well. Consider whether public schools, for both young children and college, may be right for your family.
  8. Frugal people care less about fads and trends; keeping up does not matter to them.
  9. Know the value of a dollar, if there is a lower interest rate find it.
  10. Don’t be cheap, stay generous.  It is ok to part with money to help others.

Richard Manske, CFP®                                                                                                                                      Managing Partner

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A Real World Retirement Story

My father was ready for retirement. We had several discussions about picking the right time. Choosing when to retire is always a big decision. Conventional wisdom suggests the longer you wait, the better. You have more time to save and eliminate debt. Your Social Security benefit could be higher. On the other hand, how many people do you know who died before they could retire? There is something to be said for “getting out of the game” and enjoying your life.

We discussed a myriad of items. In the interest of brevity, let’s talk about two of them: finding the right insurance coverage and managing your time.

Health care is a big ticket item. No matter how well we take care of ourselves, our bodies will need more attention as we get older. Finding the right coverage is vital. Individuals over age 65 have Medicare Part A. Most people obtain supplemental insurance coverage since Part A does not pay for everything. Some plans are very expensive. Some plans provide minimal coverage at a reduced cost. Penalties can be incurred if one does not sign up for Medicare when required. And, if someone retires before age 65, coverage must be found to bridge the gap between the retirement date and Medicare eligibility.

I was overwhelmed. I arranged for my parents to meet with an insurance agent who specializes in Medicare plans.

Thanks to the draft, my dad spent a few years in the Army. His service gave him a permanent distaste for peeling potatoes. More importantly, it provided him with access to health care benefits. His previous employer’s insurance plan was awful, so he used the VA coverage as a supplement for years. He said the prescription drug discounts are good.

The agent found appropriate policies for both of my parents. My father’s supplemental policy needs were reduced by the VA coverage, whereas my mother needed increased coverage. It helped to have someone with Medicare knowledge guide them through the process. I highly recommend seeking help instead of trying to research it on your own.

She could not help us with the other problem: occupying my dad’s time. He is not a “lounge around the house” kind of guy. He must stay busy. He made a plan for the first year of retirement. He wanted to remodel the kitchen – build cabinets, replace the countertop himself, install new flooring, et cetera. He planned to tackle some home improvement projects at my house (yeah!). He wanted to get a dog which would give him a buddy and an excuse to get outdoors. Then, in about a year, he hoped to get a part-time job at a nearby home improvement store. He would be perfect for the job, and the store employs a lot of older workers.

He knew he could not be happy unless he was busy doing something. When considering retirement, it is very important to think about how one will occupy time previously spent working. We all have fantasies about what we would do. When faced with the reality of filling those hours, though, it can be a daunting task.

In the end, my father did retire. I saw an immediate “lightness.” He smiles and laughs easily. Plagued with ulcers and wicked reflux most of his life, his gastro issues have greatly improved. Retirement definitely agrees with him.

Someday, you may have the same conversations with your parents. My advice is to get help from people who know more than you – financial advisors, insurance experts, estate planning attorneys – whenever you encounter unfamiliar issues.

The same advice applies if you are considering retirement. There is more to the issue than whether or not you will have enough money. My parents and I spent almost a year talking about it. Just as you took time to find the right career or the right house, care should be taken with retirement planning too.

Of course, Parsec is here to guide you. Retirement matters are too complex to tackle alone.

Cristy Freeman, AAMS®
Senior Operations Associate

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Renting vs. Buying

This is the fourth post in a series of six blog entries focused on topics that might be of interest to the Millennial generation.

In my experience, one of the largest financial decisions clients struggle with is the decision to rent or purchase their residence. There is not necessarily a right or wrong answer, and every individual’s situation is different. However, there are some scenarios that may help guide you in making the right choice.

Let’s start with buying. Here are five factors that may make it more beneficial to purchase:

  1. You like the idea of “forced savings” – as you pay your mortgage your balance owed is reduced. Building this equity in your home will create a form of savings for you. Since the value of the home is locked in, you can’t squander it away on dining out or shopping. You realize the savings once you decide to sell it.
  2. You think the tax incentives are attractive – when you file your taxes, you will be able to deduct mortgage interest. Property taxes will also add a nice deduction. If you do any energy-efficient improvements, you could be eligible to deduct those expenses. Another bonus is that depending on your situation, any capital gain from the future sale of your home is free from federal income tax.
  3. You want stable payments– typically your mortgage payment will never change, while rent is more susceptible to rise with inflation. Purchasing may be right for you if you are looking for a stable cost of living.
  4. You dislike the restraints placed by your landlord – often when renting you must get everything approved. If you want to paint, rip up the carpet and put down hardwoods, take out a wall or have a dog, then owning probably makes more sense. Home ownership allows you to customize a space and really have a place that you can call home.
  5. You value a second-income stream – by owning a home, there is potential to create additional income by renting part of it out. If you have an extra bedroom, finished basement, or a garage for storage, it’s possible to rent to friends, family or others to help cover your mortgage payment.
  6. Bonus – quite possibly the biggest bonus of all is you will be debt free in retirement with no mortgage payment. You will always have the expense of a rent payment if you continue renting.

But guess what… buying may not be right for everyone. It’s important to remember that there is more to owning a home than just a mortgage payment. Between maintenance, fees, and taxes, the costs can add up. And other factors may contribute to make it an unwise choice for some people to purchase. Here are five factors that may make it more beneficial to continue renting:

  1. You plan on moving – home ownership is not a short-term investment. If you think that you may be moving for any reason within the next 3-5 years, it’s wise to continue to rent. Once you are settled, revisit the topic!
  2. You don’t have good job stability – of course you can never be 100% certain if your job is stable, but the possibility of your income going down could greatly impact the type of home you can afford. If you expect to quit your job, or anticipate being let go, hold off on a home purchase until there is a bit more certainty about the future.
  3. You just aren’t that handy around the house – as a renter, you don’t have to worry about maintenance issues. If the pipes burst (something that the author can relate to), then the landlord is responsible for repairs. For a homeowner, it’s 100% on you. It’s up to the owner to paint, shovel the drive when it snows, and fix the garbage disposal when it’s broken. If you aren’t ready for the hassle or expense involved with being the fixer-upper, then perhaps home ownership just isn’t for you.
  4. You have a low credit score – having a solid credit score is vital in purchasing a home. While it may not prevent you from getting a mortgage, it could drastically affect the interest rate that you receive. If you have a score below 700 it would probably be best for you to rent while paying off debt and building up your credit.
  5. You don’t have money for a down payment – if you don’t have any cash squirreled away for a down payment, it may not be the time to purchase. If you don’t have a 20% down payment you will have to pay PMI (private mortgage insurance) which will increase cost of monthly payment. Use this time to save and budget before taking the plunge.

These are some of the basic pros and cons of renting vs. buying. Since every situation is different, it’s always best to speak with a financial advisor about the circumstances surrounding your own decision matrix.

With correct planning and consideration, we’re sure that you will come to the best decision for you!

Ashley Woodring, CFP® Financial Advisor

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7 Reasons to Consider a Prenup

This is the first in a series of six blog entries focused on topics that might be of interest to the Millennial generation. If you would like to see our attempt at making these subject matters entertaining, visit our YouTube page to see a video version of this article.

I believe Kanye West said it best when he said, “We want prenup!”

There is nothing that can kill the romance of upcoming nuptials more quickly than your partner asking you to sign a prenuptial agreement (aka prenup). But do you know what can really kill the romance? Divorce! Perhaps you are thinking, “our relationship is going to last… we’d never get a divorce.” Well let’s face it, I don’t think anyone goes into a marriage thinking that in 5-10 years they are going to split. Other people may think that the agreement is only for the rich… this is actually a misconception. While it’s true, a prenuptial agreement may not be right for everyone, the following are a few scenarios in which it will make a lot of sense:

1: One partner earns the majority of the income. If you know going into a marriage that one person will be the primary “bread winner,” a prenup can be used to determine the amount of alimony that will need to be paid upon a divorce.

2. What about the partner that doesn’t make a lot of money? The prenup can also be used to make sure that the partner who is less financially set is protected in the event of a divorce.

3. For the spouse with substantial assets. If you own a home or other substantial assets prior to a marriage, you can use a prenup toestablish that those assets that came with you, will leave with you.

4. For the stay-at-home parent: This will obviously affect your income. If it is decided prior to marriage that one parent will stay at home with the children, a prenup can be used to make sure that each parent shares in the responsibility of taking care of the children financially.

5. One partner has a significant amount of debt. A prenup can establish who will be responsible for paying off debt in the event of a divorce. This can prevent you from getting straddled with debt that the other spouse created prior to marriage.

6. Children from a previous marriage. When entering into another marriage you need to make sure that you kids are protected from another divorce. This can ensure that in the event of your death/divorce that assets that should be going to your children won’t go to your disgruntled spouse.

7. You own a business. It is possible that in the event of a divorce your spouse will end up owning part of the business. Your partner will then go from being an unwanted spouse, to an unwanted business partner. Establishing that the business is off limits in a prenup can prevent this from happening.

It’s understandable that many couples don’t even want to entertain the idea of a prenuptial agreement. The important thing to remember is that this is a document used to protect all parties. Communicate openly and listen to the concerns of your partner. Even if you do live “happily ever after,” there will always be a peace of mind involved with foresight and deliberate planning.

Ashley Woodring, CFP®

Financial Advisor

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Paralysis from Analysis

This month, I celebrate my 500th year at Parsec.  OK – it is really 22 years, but sometimes it feels like 500 years.

During that time, I have been involved in a lot of highly technical projects.  With one project in particular, I was really stressed out about the details.  I analyzed every piece of data so much that I made little progress.  Bill Hansen, one of our Managing Partners, said I suffered from “paralysis from analysis.”  After some reflection, I realized he was right.  At some point, I had to let go and realize nothing would ever be perfect.

In my lengthy career here, I have seen the effect of “paralysis from analysis.”  Some investors may be reluctant to act based upon the endless stream of information available now.  One can flip on the TV at any hour and hear the opinions of investment commentators.  Peruse the Internet, and one can find a vast amount of data about the stock market and the economy.  With so much information and contradictory opinions, it is easy to sit on the sidelines and do nothing.

In some cases, inaction can be as devastating as making the wrong choice.  Consider this scenario.  On March 9, 2009, the S&P 500 hit bottom.  A lot of people panicked and sold all holdings, leaving the proceeds in cash.  Five years later, the index was up 205.84 percent or 22.6 percent annualized (total return).

At the bottom point, there were probably a few people on TV who claimed the end was near.  One could probably find endless charts and articles foretelling great doom to come.  If an investor was paralyzed by this data overload, sat on the sidelines, and did not invest during that five-year period, he or she could have missed an opportunity to recover from deep losses.

What should a person do?  For starters, it helps to leave emotion out of the decision as much as possible.  Then, develop an investment plan that will not lead to sleepless nights.  The real test will come when the market has wild swings – either up or down.  One must commit to the plan and not deviate based upon the mood of the moment.  It is fine to alter the plan if goals or needs have changed, of course.

We at Parsec try to help our clients develop these plans and weather the inevitable market fluctuations.  Communication is a key factor in success.  We encourage our clients to tell us their goals, their changing life situations, or anything that is relevant to staying on target.

So, let’s switch off the talk shows, put down the business magazine, and take a nice walk.  Let’s try to enjoy life instead of obsess over every little detail.

Cristy Freeman, AAMS®
Senior Operations Associate

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How much is that Doggie in the Window?

According to a recent announcement from the American Pet Products Association, Americans spent $55.7 billion last year on their pets. That’s billion, not million. An article at Time.com (http://time.com/#23451/pets-dogs-cats-spending-americans/) cleverly noted that the figure is $10 billion more than Germany spends on its defense budget.

I admit I am one of these people. My little rescue dog hit the lottery when she came to live with me. She has seven dog beds, if you include her car seat (yes, car seat). She owns more jackets than I do, although they are all for function, not fashion. She has multiple, color-coordinated harnesses, collars, and leashes so that she need never feel ashamed about how she looks. When we go on vacation, she has as much luggage as I do. Yes, she is spoiled rotten.

I am not alone. Bill Geist of the “CBS Sunday Morning” program tells a hilarious story about his “free” rescue dog: http://www.cbsnews.com/news/even-cat-people-fall-in-puppy-love/.  Sometimes, the unexpected costs can really add up.

In our industry, I see a number of fees that some people pay for investments: high commission rates for certain products, either on the front or back end of the transaction; frequent, unnecessary trade costs from a practice called “churning;” and expensive investment counsel fees. Before long, that simple purchase of 100 shares of ABC Widget Works has cost a fortune in added fees.

When you are evaluating an investment advisor, consider how the person earns his or her money. Does he receive a commission for his or her investment recommendations? Is he or she directly affiliated with a broker? Does he or she charge an additional investment counsel fee? While he or she may promise a great gross return on investment, the net return after all of those fees may be no better than what you would find with a simple savings account.

At Parsec, we do not receive commissions for any of the investment products we recommend – no commission from the trade, no commission for recommending a certain security, nothing. In addition, when we recommend mutual funds, we look for funds that do not carry significant internal fees.

We are not beholden to a particular broker. We have four brokers who we like to recommend, based upon client needs.

We do charge an investment counsel fee that we think is reasonable to industry standards. When you sign a service agreement, you see upfront what your fee schedule will be. On a quarterly basis, you receive a reports package that includes information about net-of-fee investment performance, current holdings, et cetera. We are also here to help with planning – everything from college savings to retirement to estate. We like to think service goes beyond placing a trade. Our clients pay us to act as a partner in planning their future.

Everything in life – from owning a home to adopting a rescue dog – has the potential for unexpected costs. How you invest your money, though, should be a little more straightforward. With a little research in advance, you can evaluate whether or not fees charged for service are reasonable and affordable.

Now, if you will excuse me, I need to order organic food for my doggie. And maybe I will pick up a bottle of shampoo. She told me she is tired of smelling like a bowl of oatmeal.

Cristy Freeman, AAMS
Senior Operations Associate

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Does Jiro Dream of Retirement Too?

I recently moved to the Asheville area after living in Atlanta for twelve years. Ironically, the seeds of my move started around the time I purchased my very first home in Brookhaven, a charming neighborhood in Atlanta. I say ironically because for the prior ten years I held a fairly good and financially stable job, yet had never considered buying a house. Why not you ask? Well, I wasn’t sure myself until last week when I watched the documentary, “Jiro Dreams of Sushi” – which, by the way, I highly recommend.

Jiro is a world-renowned – – perhaps the world-renowned – – sushi chef, operating a tiny ten-seat restaurant inside one of Tokyo’s hundreds of subway stations. Jiro seemed to have no worries about money as far as I could tell, and at age ninety-something, he wasn’t quite ready to retire either. Something about Jiro, his perspective on- and relationship to his work prompted questions within me, questions about my own career, my relationship to my work, and my dreams for the future. Because as far as I can tell, most of us, myself included, work and save, plan and invest, with the hope and dream of one day retiring so that we no longer have to work. But in Jiro’s case, his work was his dream. It was one and the same. Which really hit a nerve in me and at the same time provided some clarity.

What I realized was that for the ten years prior to buying my first house, despite having a good job that would allow me to do it, my dreams and plans for my future life did not involve doing the work I was doing at the time. Meaning, I was not fully engaged in my career or my life and as a result I was often on the lookout for an escape route – and buying a house would have been a major impediment to escape. The job was a good one, interesting enough, and certainly gave me financial stability, but I believed happiness lived in some other job, at some other firm, pursuing some other career. I became so hungry for change that in 2008 I actually quit my job and moved to France for nine months. Interestingly enough, despite a fantastic, and in many ways, unexpected trip, I came home to find myself in almost exactly the same place. I say almost because while the circumstances, people, and places looked about the same, my perspective had changed.

I returned to my old job, worked with the “old” coworkers, and rented another apartment in the same old city. But having lived across the pond, having had the experiences I had, and having returned, I saw in the end that there actually was no escape. Good news really, because before France I planned and saved my money to escape my life, but after France I planned and saved my money to live more deeply into my life. As a result of this small shift, life and I were much more on the same page. It was in the midst of this shift that I started taking a deeper interest in my work as a financial analyst. I became more curious and engaged, and in turn the work itself grew more engaging and satisfying. A virtuous cycle had begun and continues today. It was when I finally stepped into my life and stopped trying to escape it that a new life, as such, presented itself. Just a year and half after purchasing my first house in Atlanta, a new and exciting career and life opportunity presented itself, and in my dream-city (Asheville), no less.

All this to say, that while planning for retirement, setting goals, and making smart choices are hugely important and necessary components of a satisfying and rewarding retirement, so too is engaging with our current circumstances, in our current jobs, and in our current lives, just as they are today. Thanks Jiro.

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Where is My Money?

It seems there are always stories in the news about the latest scheme that has defrauded many people. Seeking a big return, people give their hard-earned dollars to criminals. The big return is never realized. All the money is lost.

With all the bad guys in our industry, I can understand how someone would look at Parsec with a skeptical eye. I am not going to discuss our performance returns or market strategies in this post. I want to discuss something a little more basic that everyone should consider when interviewing a potential investment advisor: “Where is my money?”

In some cases, the victim gives the criminal money to buy investments. In turn, the fraudsters provide the victim with a statement showing assets purchased with that money. It may contain the names of easily recognizable companies. Without an actual stock certificate behind that piece of paper, the statement is worthless.

At Parsec, we do not take custody of your assets. The assets are held at an independent broker, in your name. We recommend Charles Schwab, Fidelity, and T.D. Ameritrade, all brokers whose names you probably recognize. You will receive a quarterly statement from us that contains performance statistics and other information. You also receive a monthly statement from the independent broker so you know exactly what you own in each investment account.

Furthermore, we do not have the authority to move those assets to an unlike-registered account without your consent. You must sign a letter or form to authorize the movement of securities to unlike-registered accounts, which adds another layer of security.

When assets are held at a broker and registered to you, an independent source tells you what you own. There are no “phantom” assets. Also, giving someone the ability to move assets to accounts not registered in your name can be dangerous if in the wrong hands.

When you select an investment advisor, I hope you will ask this very basic question. You worked hard to accumulate what you have. Don’t let an unscrupulous person take it away from you.

Cristy Freeman, AAMS
Senior Operations Associate

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Time is Running Out!

When we were kids, it seemed to take FOREVER for Christmas to get here.  After Thanksgiving, you knew it was close but oh so far!  Nowadays, it seems as if December just flies by.  We have so much to do!  How do we get it all done?

In the midst of the holiday chaos, let’s take a moment to handle charitable donations.  Your favorite non-profit organization appreciates anything you can do for them. 

You still have time to make a donation.  You must make cash donations by December 31 to count them toward the 2013 tax year. 

If you want to donate securities, call us the second you read this blog post.  Time is running out to ensure processing of these types of donations by December 31.

Also, if you have old clothes, furniture, or other items to donate, you should deliver the items to the charity by December 31.  (Some charities even offer pick-up service.)  Make a detailed list of the items you donated.  If something is particularly valuable, it would be a good idea to snap a picture.  You would have proof, if you are ever audited, of the item’s condition.

It is possible to get everything done on time.  As I mentioned, charities need our support.  Just take a deep breath, make a list, and do one thing at a time.  If you planned to make a donation, just add them to the “to do” list.

We hope everyone has a safe holiday season and a healthy, happy new year.

Cristy Freeman, AAMS
Senior Operations Associate

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Leaking Hot Water Heaters

Our Asheville office was built in 1892.  I cannot speak for any upgrades made between 1892 and the mid-1980s, but I would like to think there were a few.  When Parsec moved into this building around 1986, almost the entire building had been remodeled.  It was brought up to what was then considered modern standards.

Over the years, we have experienced lots of challenges with our building.  For example, it is always fun to run network cable.  If you have ever renovated an old house, you can appreciate the architecture – and frustration – of buildings that were never designed for the age of technology.

Our latest adventure involves remodeling the top and main floor restrooms.  It was supposed to be a simple job of replacing fixtures, painting, et cetera.  Unfortunately, we discovered that the hot water heaters (inexplicably located in the ceiling) were leaking and needed replacement.  The contractor then uncovered significant water damage in one of the bathrooms, resulting in an almost complete gut of that room.

The project is now over budget due to these unexpected expenses.  As with everything else in life, the best laid plans are often derailed by things you cannot foresee.  The same principle applies to your financial life.

While we can design a careful plan for any financial goal, things happen.  You could encounter a bear market.  Or the stork can bring an unexpected baby late in life.  Or your college graduate child could move home to live with you, thwarting your plans to downsize your home.

The key to success is to be adaptable.  Realize that you will most likely need to periodically adjust your financial plan.  It will not be static.

We are here to help.  We greatly appreciate it when you tell us of life’s unexpected events.  We are a team, working together to help you meet as many of your financial goals as you can.  We encourage you to call us so we can stay on track.

Cristy Freeman, AAMS
Senior Operations Associate

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