Bear Market Post-Traumatic Stress Syndrome

The economic turmoil of the recent Recession, and its aftershocks, cut deep into our lives and our psyche. People are still suffering from the recession, which lasted from December 2007 to May 2009, here in March of 2011. Some of it is due to true economic hardship; other of it is due to post-traumatic stress syndrome (PTSS).

I’m not physiologist, and I don’t mean to make light of serious forms of PTSS, but I do believe that many people are suffering from a lighter form of recession PTSS. The smallest market dip has investors jittery, and I’m hearing worries once again of another recession. Investors who were able to withstand the last bear market are not so sure they’re up for it again. One sharp decline and they’re ready to bail out for good.

As an investment professional, I see signs of PTSS in myself. Other investment managers will remember the horrible, wrenching feeling of walking out of the office at the end of the day on any given day Sept 2008 – March of 2009, with the bloodbath that was Wall Street in your wake. Each day, my colleagues would mumble to each other on the way out the door, that we felt that we had just been physically beaten. Just one day of a down stock market brings back a flood of those bad memories.

The trigger for this PTSS is a volatile market. Now the storm is brewing – unrest in the middle East, oil prices spiking, the national debt load, and a hesitant economic recovery. Despite that fact that investors know that the stock market never goes straight up and that periods of decline are normal, it seems that all those invested in the stock market have an unusually itchy trigger finger, ready to sell at the slightest dips. Therefore, it’s worth a mention of the big picture: Investing in stocks is a long-term commitment, and guessing the short-term direction of the market is hazardous to your financial health.

You must choose the amount of your net worth that you are willing to commit to this asset class with this particular risk-return tradeoff. Once you choose, you cannot be shaken by short-term turmoil. Buying low and selling high inherently means that you do not sell, or allocate away from stocks, when the market is going down. It means the opposite, you buy stocks when they are low and economic uncertainty is at a peak. For the average investor it is extremely difficult to add new money during market declines, but at least by keeping your nest egg in place you avoid the money-losing pitfall of selling during a (real or predicted) decline.

Harli L. Palme, CFP®

Financial Advisor

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An Unexpected Windfall

At the start of every new year people make resolutions to lose weight, alter bad habits, or save more money.  While I cannot help you with some of those issues, I can offer a little advice on saving money.

For 2011, the IRS has reduced the employee-paid portion of the Social Security tax from 6.2 to 4.2 percent.  While that may not seem like a large amount of money on a per-paycheck basis, it can add up to a nice sum for the year.  If you earn the maximum Social Security wage limit of $106,800, 2 percent represents $2,136.

Before you grow accustomed to having a few extra dollars in your paycheck, I recommend you implement a plan now.  Here are a few suggestions:

  • Deposit the funds into your emergency savings account.  Everyone needs an emergency savings account.  Opinions vary about the amount.  Some suggest 3 months’ worth of routine expenses.  Other say 6 to 9 months are needed.  
  • If your emergency savings account is well funded, apply the dollars to debt.  You could apply the extra money toward the smallest debt, if you want to experience the rush of the early payoff.  However, you will be financially better off if you to apply it to the account with the highest interest rate.  Reducing debt levels is always a great idea.
  • Fund a Roth IRA if you qualify.  If not, apply the savings to another retirement vehicle, such as your company’s 401(k) or a traditional IRA account.

I recommend that you use automatic bank drafts for any of the above options.  It is a simple way to transfer the funds from your account before you can spend them.  Parsec can assist you with setting up an automatic transfer into your brokerage accounts.

I hope you have a safe, healthy new year and wish you the best of luck in accomplishing your goals!

Cristy Freeman, AAMS
Senior Operations Associate

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2010 Roth IRA and Regular IRA Contributions

The deadline to contribute to your Roth or Traditional IRA for the tax year 2010 is April 15, 2011. You can contribute $5,000 or the amount of earned income for the year, whichever is less. If you’re over 50, you can contribute an additional $1,000.

Your income determines if you qualify for a tax-deductible Traditional IRA contribution, or if you qualify to make a Roth IRA contribution.

Do you qualify to deduct your Traditional IRA contribution?
 If your income is less than the beginning of the phase-out range, you qualify.  If your income is over the phase-out range, you do not.  If your income falls inside the range, you partially qualify.
  Modified Adjusted Gross Income                                          Phase-Out Range
Single, participates in an employer-sponsored retirement plan      $56,000 – $66,000
Married, participates in an employer-sponsored retirement plan      $89,000 – $109,000
Married, your spouse participates in an employer-sponsored retirement plan, but you do not.  $167,000 – $177,000
 
Do you qualify to contribute to a Roth IRA?
Single $105,000 – $120,000
Married, filing jointly     $167,000 – $177,000

 

Harli L. Palme, CFP®

Financial Advisor

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Financial Industry Reform

The banking overhaul bill has passed!  To quote the Kiplinger Letter, “The regulatory revamping cuts a wide swath, giving broad power to Uncle Sam to protect consumers and discourage banks from engaging in risky behavior.”  The main goal of the law is to prevent a crisis like the one experienced in 2008.  Let’s hope the law will act as a warning system when greed and fear creep into decisions being made by financial institutions.  One of the key components is that the Fed now has the authority to seize big financial firms and banks before panic sets in.  The largest of banks will increase their reserves so that they are less likely to crash in economic down turns.  Harry Reid was quoted saying, “Now no bank is too big to fail.”  However, there will always be financial giants that would cause disaster in world markets if they failed.  The new higher capital requirements of the big banks will make lending standards more demanding, which will have a slight drag on the recovering economy.  GDP is expected to be 3-3.5% in 2010.  The big banks will also be required to hold 5% of the loans they underwrite in their own portfolio.  Smaller banks have less capital requirements then big banks, but they could be affected by the reduction in certain fees that can be charged to consumers.  The bill does permanently increase the FDIC insurance to $250,000 per account.  The SEC also gains authority to force corporations to let shareholders nominate candidates for boards.  The bill was not intended to provide investor protection.  However, increased transparency and disclosure by financial firms that could help prevent a meltdown will be good news to investors.

Gregory D. James, CFP®

Partner

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George, I Can Lie About My Age!!

This year, I celebrate a milestone birthday. Let’s just say I am now officially too old to be George Clooney’s girlfriend.

As often happens with milestone birthdays, you reflect about how you imagined your life would be at this stage. Perhaps you had envisioned retiring at an early age. Maybe you wanted to start your own business. Or save tons of money, quit your job, and travel around the world for a couple of years. (Hey, you can dream.)

Then, life happened. You devoted yourself to a career. You bought a home. You got married and started a family. The years go by. You wake up one day and realize you’re that age.

When you first began your journey with Parsec, your goals were just rough ideas of where you thought you wanted to be in 10, 15, 20 years. Now that time has passed, are those goals still the same? Have you been affected by any of these events:

• Started a family
• Sent a child to college
• Lost your job
• Dealt with aging parents

We would also be remiss if we overlooked the extraordinary market volatility of the last two years.  All of the above events can significantly alter your financial plan.

Do you still have the same goals now that you did before these events occurred? Has your “deadline” for achieving those goals shifted? It is very easy in the day-to-day rush to not think about these things. However, it is important to evaluate your financial situation and goals periodically so you can stay on track.

Your financial advisor is here to help you. Together, he or she can review your financial plan and work to keep it in line with your changing life. Just call him or her anytime.

Cristy Freeman, AAMS
Senior Operations Associate

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