Call Me….Maybe

I recently saw an article titled, “Use Puts and Calls to Finance Your Holiday Gift Shopping.” It proceeds to explain how you can employ certain options strategies (shorting puts and covered calls), to generate portfolio income – in this case, a little extra cash for purchasing holiday gifts.

“My Parsec advisor hasn’t suggested this to me,” you think. In fact, your Parsec advisor hasn’t suggested any options or derivatives strategy to you! What gives? Aren’t we supposed to be looking out for our clients’ best interests?

Yes, we are. And that is why we typically won’t suggest such a strategy to you. Not that there is anything wrong with it, per se, but most derivatives strategies are short-term in nature, and one of our main tenets is investing for the long-term.

Even though the author of this article is suggesting relatively safe (rather than speculative) strategies, there is risk involved, and the upside is limited. When you short (a.k.a. sell or write) a covered call, you give someone the option to purchase a stock that you own at a predetermined (strike) price, in exchange for payment (known as the option premium). Shorting (selling or writing) puts involves giving someone the option to sell you a particular stock at a predetermined price, also in exchange for a premium. If you enter into one of these contracts, you are obligated to either sell or buy the underlying stock if the owner exercises the option. If the option expires unexercised, you keep the premium without having to sell or buy the underlying.

The objective is to enter into contracts that you think are unlikely to be exercised based on your prediction of the underlying stock’s price movement, and earn income by pocketing the premium. Of course, there’s always the chance that the market will move in such a way that the owner will choose to exercise the option, and you will be forced to make a trade.

So let’s think about this – why would someone exercise a call option? Obviously because the market price has moved above the strike price and they can buy it for less, then turn around and sell it for a profit. So you’re selling a stock that’s going up (at a below-market price), and giving up any potential upside in that stock.

And why would someone exercise a put option? Because the current price of the underlying stock has dropped below the strike price, so they can sell it to you for more than it’s worth in the market. Even assuming that it’s a stock that you want to own, wouldn’t it be better to buy it at the lower market price? If you calculated the breakeven correctly, the premium earned on the option would offset the difference in strike and market price, but then you’re effectively at zero, having earned nothing (such as dividend income) in the interim.

Our philosophy is that the best results occur over a long time period, in portfolios consisting of a well-diversified array of carefully chosen, quality investments. We make buy and sell decisions based on in-depth research of underlying company fundamentals, rather than market predictions. In this way, we seek to avoid the pitfalls of human behavior and emotion, as well as the likelihood of inaccurate predictions. We like to be owners of companies with real earnings and dividends, and participate in long-term, profitable investments because this is how we help you attain your financial goals…such as a long, comfortable retirement as well as the perfect gift for everyone on your list.

Sarah DerGarabedian, CFA  Portfolio Manager

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