Taxable Income Reduction Strategies

As a trusted financial advisors for our clients, our priority is to stay apprised on current tax laws, as well as provide planning opportunities to reduce future tax liabilities. For many of our clients, their Traditional IRAs are also their largest tax liability. When an IRA is responsibly managed, the hope is that the account will continue growing until the owner’s late 70s. At that point in time, the mandatory withdrawals from the account may offset any capital appreciation and earnings on the account. When taking into account these growth expectations, as well as the client’s necessary cash flow, many clients find that the RMDs in their 80s will far exceed their necessary cash flow. These factors contribute to an increasing likelihood of the client having a higher tax rate later in life. Higher Modified Adjusted Gross Income(MAGI) is one concern that has a trickle down effect. When MAGI gets high enough, it can result in an income based adjustment for Medicare Part B and D. It should be clear by now that a healthy retirement can actually increase tax concerns.

So, by now you may be saying, “Thanks for the depressing news Daniel, I don’t think I want to read any further. ” I encourage you to keep reading.
 
Controlling Income

The first step in keeping MAGI low is controlling income. For retired individuals, there are two main sources of cash flow. The first being social security and pensions. These are fixed amounts that cannot be changed. The second source is income from personal assets. This includes brokerage accounts, Traditional IRAs, and Roth IRAs. A brokerage account is not a tax-deferred account. Therefore any income produced by the account will contribute to MAGI. It is possible to manipulate a brokerage account’s holdings to reduce taxable income. The second source of cash flow is withdrawals made from Traditional IRAs to supplement income or fulfill an RMD. These withdrawals are fully taxable to the individual. In addition to Traditional IRA withdrawals, Roth IRA withdrawals can be made, however, these withdrawals are not taxable to the individual if made after 59 ½. The IRS gives us tax tables, from these, we are able to determine the maximum amount of taxable income we want to produce for clients. As I said before, it may become impossible to keep income below this desired threshold when RMDs get larger and larger. If this is the case, we move on to advanced planning techniques.

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Roth Conversions and Charitable Remainder Trusts 
One of our favorite techniques to reduce the impact of RMDs is to combine the benefits of a Roth IRA with a charitable gift. The establishment of a Charitable Remainder Trust may allow someone with charitable intentions for their estate to realize the benefit now. The Charitable Remainder Trust can provide a lifetime income stream for the donor, as well as provide a large charitable deduction. In this tandem planning technique, the charitable deduction can offset the income incurred from a Traditional to Roth conversion. The reduction in the size of the Traditional IRA will also truncate the amount of the RMD going forward.
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This particular technique is just an example of some of the advanced planning options we evaluate with our clients. Every situation is different with special circumstances to consider. If you have any questions about these strategies, contact one of our advisors.
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Leaking Hot Water Heaters

Our Asheville office was built in 1892.  I cannot speak for any upgrades made between 1892 and the mid-1980s, but I would like to think there were a few.  When Parsec moved into this building around 1986, almost the entire building had been remodeled.  It was brought up to what was then considered modern standards.

Over the years, we have experienced lots of challenges with our building.  For example, it is always fun to run network cable.  If you have ever renovated an old house, you can appreciate the architecture – and frustration – of buildings that were never designed for the age of technology.

Our latest adventure involves remodeling the top and main floor restrooms.  It was supposed to be a simple job of replacing fixtures, painting, et cetera.  Unfortunately, we discovered that the hot water heaters (inexplicably located in the ceiling) were leaking and needed replacement.  The contractor then uncovered significant water damage in one of the bathrooms, resulting in an almost complete gut of that room.

The project is now over budget due to these unexpected expenses.  As with everything else in life, the best laid plans are often derailed by things you cannot foresee.  The same principle applies to your financial life.

While we can design a careful plan for any financial goal, things happen.  You could encounter a bear market.  Or the stork can bring an unexpected baby late in life.  Or your college graduate child could move home to live with you, thwarting your plans to downsize your home.

The key to success is to be adaptable.  Realize that you will most likely need to periodically adjust your financial plan.  It will not be static.

We are here to help.  We greatly appreciate it when you tell us of life’s unexpected events.  We are a team, working together to help you meet as many of your financial goals as you can.  We encourage you to call us so we can stay on track.

Cristy Freeman, AAMS
Senior Operations Associate

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The Bucket List

Several years ago, I read a self-help book that promised to help me manage money better.  I do not remember much about the book, not even the title.  I do remember one exercise that was very useful.

I was supposed to create what is now commonly known as a “bucket list.”  I should list all of the things I wanted to do during my lifetime.  It did not matter how long the list was.  When finished with the list, I should then review it and think about how a change in money management practices could help me achieve those goals.  That would help me to set a budget, make more responsible spending decisions, et cetera.  After all, you need money to pay for most of the things you want to do in life.

I found the exercise to be very enlightening.  To my surprise, I saw that most of the items related to travel.  I realized that I needed to do a better job at maintaining an emergency fund and set a formal budget for travel.  I had been tapping the emergency fund whenever I wanted to visit some place new, which is a bad idea.  I setup a direct debit from my checking to my savings account so that savings could be automatic.  This act created a formal budget for both emergency savings and travel.

Today’s list is very different.  My revised list includes completing several projects around the house, paying off my mortgage a few years early, donating more money to my favorite charity, buying a nice road bike, and squirreling away more money for unexpected expenses and retirement.  Sure, there are a few personal goals that are not tied to money; I am not completely shallow.  In balance, the list is much more practical than years ago, when I wanted to see the world.

I still do not want to wake up one day at age 80 and realize all I ever did was work, work, work.  The list can help me stay focused on important things and achieve some of my goals.  Hopefully, I can strike the right balance between the practical (saving for retirement) and the fun (buying that road bike).  I encourage you to take some time to create your own list.

Then, please share your list with your financial advisor.  Goals change over time, so he or she should be aware of what you want from life.  Together, you can develop a financial plan to direct your savings in a manner that will bring you closer to achieving your goals.

Cristy Freeman, AAMS
Senior Operations Associate

 

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Scared Money Don’t Make Money

Recently, I heard the above phrase in a rap song by Pitbull.  I was surprised to hear mention of investment risk/reward in a popular song.  He did not go on to discuss European economic instability or currency valuation.  That would have been truly shocking.

The statement provokes thought, though.  People who are willing to take the most risk have the potential for greater reward – and greater loss.  It is easy to have an asset allocation of 100 percent equities in an up market.  Can you keep that allocation when the market is significantly down?  Will you still sleep at night?

On the other hand, holding money in a money market fund earning near-zero interest is also a risky proposition.  You must find some vehicle in which to invest because you cannot afford to earn nothing for your money.  Inflation continues to rise, even when interest rates are not.  The dollar you stash in a mattress will not be worth the same 10 years from now as it is today.

Finding the right allocation is very tricky.  It requires a great deal of evaluation on your part.  What is your current age?  Do you have enough time to recover from a short-term loss?  What are your investment goals for the next 5, 10, 15 years?  When do you want to retire? 

This is just a sample of some of the questions you should ask yourself.  A thoughtful review of your situation with your investment advisor will help the two of you to determine the best asset allocation.  Being brutally honest with yourself and communicating your goals, thoughts, and concerns with your investment advisor will allow you to work as a team.  The two of you will be able to find the right allocation that can help you sleep a little better at night.

Cristy Freeman, AAMS
Senior Operations Associate

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