(Tax loss) Harvest Season is Almost Here!

The kids are back in school, the leaves are changing colors, and pumpkin spice lattes – the age-old harbingers of harvest season – are everywhere. At Parsec, we are preparing for the harvest…of tax losses.

Every year, beginning in late October/early November, Parsec’s portfolio managers will scour clients’ taxable accounts for meaningful losses, which we can use to offset realized gains created from trading throughout the year. These tax-efficient trading strategies provide value to clients by minimizing their tax burden while keeping the portfolio aligned with their financial planning goals.

You might see trades from one security into another one that is similar, but not exactly the same – we do this so that you can recognize a loss while maintaining exposure to the same industry or sector, yet avoid incurring a wash sale. According to IRS publication 550, “a wash sale occurs when you sell or trade stock or securities at a loss and within 30 days before or after the sale, you buy substantially identical stock or securities,” either in the same account or in another household account, including IRAs and Roth IRAs. Stocks of different companies in the same industry are not considered “substantially identical,” nor are ETFs that track the same sector but are managed by different companies (like a Vanguard Emerging Markets ETF vs. an iShares Emerging Markets ETF).

Sometimes it makes sense to place a loss-harvesting trade and leave the proceeds in cash for 31 days, then repurchase the same security. We may do this for clients who have cash needs during the holiday season, with the intention of placing rebalancing trades in January when there is no more need for liquidity. When liquidity is not an issue, however, we prefer to keep the funds fully invested in another high-quality name. We may later choose to reverse the trade, once the wash sale period has expired, or we may leave the trade in place if we think it is appropriate and suits the clients’ needs.

Sarah DerGarabedian, CFA
Director of Portfolio Management

 

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2016 IRA Contribution Rules

The deadline to make IRA contributions for tax year 2016 is April, 18 2017. The maximum contribution is $5,500 per individual ($6,500 if age 50 or over) or 100 percent of earned income, whichever is less.

There are income limits which determine whether you can deduct your Traditional IRA contribution or if you qualify to make a Roth contribution. The following table gives the phase-out range for the most common circumstances.

Do you qualify to deduct your Traditional IRA contribution?
If your income is less than the beginning of the phase-out range, you qualify. If your income is over the phase-out range, you do not. If your income falls inside the range, you partially qualify.

Modified Adjusted Gross Income Phase-Out Range
Tax Filing Status For 2016 Contributions For 2017 Contributions
Single, participates in an employer-sponsored retirement plan: $61,000 – $71,000 $62,000 – $72,000
Married filing jointly, participates in an employer-sponsored retirement plan: $98,000 – $118,000 $99,000 – $119,000
Married filing jointly, your spouse participates in an employer-sponsored retirement plan, but you do not: $184,000 – $194,000 $186,000 – $196,000

Do you qualify to contribute to a Roth IRA?

Modified Adjusted Gross Income Phase-Out Range – Roth
Tax Filing Status For 2016 Contributions For 2017 Contributions
Single: $117,000-$132,000 $118,000-$132,999
Married, filing jointly: $184,000-$194,000 $186,000-$195,999

If your filing status differs from those listed above, please contact your advisor and he or she can help you determine whether you qualify.

Harli Palme, CFA, CFP®
Partner

Harli Palme

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Gen Y, Say Yes to Stocks!

It started with anecdotal evidence: a conversation with a co-worker about a group of professionals he spoke to about their 401k. The wiser (by which I mean older) folks were asking about the outlook for the economy and how they could maximize their 401k contributions. But the young man in the group, who was in his early 30s, expressed complete contempt for the stock market.  All of his money, he said, was in cash. Then a client of mine who is nearing retirement called me just to tell me about a dinner he went to where the topic of investing came up.  He was shocked at how vehement the young people at the table were about not investing in stocks due to their risk.

Since then I’ve read about a growing body of evidence coming from surveys and other research that suggests that the younger generations are too conservative in their investments. Gen Y is saving but not investing aggressively enough. The problem is that they distrust financial institutions (we don’t count) and believe another financial meltdown is all but imminent.

Gen Y, we don’t blame you. You were in your teens on Sept. 11, 2001, which had to have rocked whatever concept of stability you had. By the time you were old enough to know what the stock market was, the technology-driven crash of 2001-2002 was causing strife in budding 401k plans. And just when you were starting to dream about home ownership the housing market was spiraling out of control in 2008-2010. Many of you watched your parents go through extreme financial duress during this time period, something you were well old enough to understand.

It’s no wonder that Generation Y is too conservative. Your generation doesn’t have the benefit of personally experiencing the roaring 80s and 90s to boost your confidence about the markets. You don’t know who Crockett and Tubbs are. Looking at historical stock returns on paper just isn’t the same as living through it. And it’s hard to understand why men ever wore over-sized shoulder pads, but they did. Even the last five (amazing) years of positive stock markets seems like mere payback for the horror of 2008-2009. Despite this, we have to remember that stocks have historically provided the highest long-term return. No matter what your steadfast beliefs are about the future of the economy, it probably carries no more predictive capacity than the next differing opinion. That’s why we look to history as a guide, rather than trying to guess the future.

When you look at stock volatility over long time frames, it isn’t nearly as risky as the day-to-day movement would have you believe. In the last 87 years large company stocks’ annual returns ranged from -43% in the worst year to +54% in the best. That’s quite a spread! But those same stocks in any given 20 year period (starting on any given day in any year) averaged returns in a range of +3% in the worst 20-year period to nearly +18% in the best 20-year period. That includes the Great Depression and the market crashes of this century. That’s a lot easier to swallow. You have a long time before liquidating your accounts for retirement – probably more than 30 years, so you should be taking a longer term view.

And let’s not forget about inflation. That cash that’s in your 401k is doing less than nothing for you. Long run inflation is around 3%. If you are getting a 0% return on your cash, that is actually -3% in real dollars, guaranteed.

Saving money isn’t good enough. Millennials need to invest with a little more oomph. Yes, diligently putting away $500 a month for 30 years is hard work and no one wants to see their money shrink. But consider this: if you get a modest 4% average return on those savings, you will have $347,000 in retirement; if you double that return to 8% an amazing thing happens: $745,000. Taking risk means a lot of ups and downs along the way, but potentially twice the money in the end. If you can go cliff-jumping with your friends, you can buy stocks, right? (No? Was that just my friends?)

There is no reward without risk, to be sure. Any investment plan should be done with the full comprehension of the volatility, range of outcomes and potential for return. There certainly is risk in losing money in the stock market over short and intermediate time periods. However, those losses only become permanent if you sell out during periods of decline. It seems all but certain that an all-cash/fixed income portfolio is doomed to growth too slow to possibly reach any long-term financial goals.

 

Harli L. Palme, CFA, CFP®

A Gen-exer who believes all of the above applies to her generation too, except the part about over-sized shoulder pads.

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The Bucket List

Several years ago, I read a self-help book that promised to help me manage money better.  I do not remember much about the book, not even the title.  I do remember one exercise that was very useful.

I was supposed to create what is now commonly known as a “bucket list.”  I should list all of the things I wanted to do during my lifetime.  It did not matter how long the list was.  When finished with the list, I should then review it and think about how a change in money management practices could help me achieve those goals.  That would help me to set a budget, make more responsible spending decisions, et cetera.  After all, you need money to pay for most of the things you want to do in life.

I found the exercise to be very enlightening.  To my surprise, I saw that most of the items related to travel.  I realized that I needed to do a better job at maintaining an emergency fund and set a formal budget for travel.  I had been tapping the emergency fund whenever I wanted to visit some place new, which is a bad idea.  I setup a direct debit from my checking to my savings account so that savings could be automatic.  This act created a formal budget for both emergency savings and travel.

Today’s list is very different.  My revised list includes completing several projects around the house, paying off my mortgage a few years early, donating more money to my favorite charity, buying a nice road bike, and squirreling away more money for unexpected expenses and retirement.  Sure, there are a few personal goals that are not tied to money; I am not completely shallow.  In balance, the list is much more practical than years ago, when I wanted to see the world.

I still do not want to wake up one day at age 80 and realize all I ever did was work, work, work.  The list can help me stay focused on important things and achieve some of my goals.  Hopefully, I can strike the right balance between the practical (saving for retirement) and the fun (buying that road bike).  I encourage you to take some time to create your own list.

Then, please share your list with your financial advisor.  Goals change over time, so he or she should be aware of what you want from life.  Together, you can develop a financial plan to direct your savings in a manner that will bring you closer to achieving your goals.

Cristy Freeman, AAMS
Senior Operations Associate

 

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Scared Money Don’t Make Money

Recently, I heard the above phrase in a rap song by Pitbull.  I was surprised to hear mention of investment risk/reward in a popular song.  He did not go on to discuss European economic instability or currency valuation.  That would have been truly shocking.

The statement provokes thought, though.  People who are willing to take the most risk have the potential for greater reward – and greater loss.  It is easy to have an asset allocation of 100 percent equities in an up market.  Can you keep that allocation when the market is significantly down?  Will you still sleep at night?

On the other hand, holding money in a money market fund earning near-zero interest is also a risky proposition.  You must find some vehicle in which to invest because you cannot afford to earn nothing for your money.  Inflation continues to rise, even when interest rates are not.  The dollar you stash in a mattress will not be worth the same 10 years from now as it is today.

Finding the right allocation is very tricky.  It requires a great deal of evaluation on your part.  What is your current age?  Do you have enough time to recover from a short-term loss?  What are your investment goals for the next 5, 10, 15 years?  When do you want to retire? 

This is just a sample of some of the questions you should ask yourself.  A thoughtful review of your situation with your investment advisor will help the two of you to determine the best asset allocation.  Being brutally honest with yourself and communicating your goals, thoughts, and concerns with your investment advisor will allow you to work as a team.  The two of you will be able to find the right allocation that can help you sleep a little better at night.

Cristy Freeman, AAMS
Senior Operations Associate

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