2017 IRA Contribution Rules

The deadline to make IRA contributions for tax year 2017 is Tuesday, April 17. The maximum contribution is $5,500 per individual ($6,500 if age 50 or over) or 100 percent of earned income, whichever is less.

There are income limits which determine whether you can deduct your Traditional IRA contribution or if you qualify to make a Roth contribution. The following table gives the phase-out range for the most common circumstances. Keep in mind that if neither you nor your spouse participates in a work-sponsored plan, you can deduct IRA contributions regardless of your income.

Do you qualify to deduct your Traditional IRA contribution?
If your income is less than the beginning of the phase-out range, you qualify. If your income is over the phase-out range, you do not. If your income falls inside the range, you partially qualify.

Modified Adjusted Gross Income Phase-Out Range
Tax Filing Status For 2017 Contributions For 2018 Contributions
Single, participates in an employer-sponsored retirement plan: $62,000 – $72,000 $63,000 – $73,000
Married filing jointly, participates in an employer-sponsored retirement plan: $99,000 – $119,000 $101,000 – $121,000
Married filing jointly, your spouse participates in an employer-sponsored retirement plan, but you do not: $186,000 – $196,000 $189,000 – $199,000

Do you qualify to contribute to a Roth IRA?

Modified Adjusted Gross Income Phase-Out Range – Roth
Tax Filing Status For 2017 Contributions For 2018 Contributions
Single: $118,000-$133,000 $120,000-$135,000
Married, filing jointly: $186,000-$196,000 $189,000-$199,000

If your filing status differs from those listed above, please contact your advisor and he or she can help you determine whether you qualify.

Harli Palme, CFA, CFP®

 

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Get Ready for Tax Season

Regardless of whether you prepare your own tax return or hire a professional to do it for you, you are still responsible for collecting the information necessary to complete it.  Well-organized records can make the process significantly easier and potentially save money with your CPA who typically charges by the hour.

One way to tackle this chore is to create a checklist of the documents and information needed to complete your return.  As you gather the documents, start to organize them in a file by the following categories and check them off the list.

Prior Year’s Tax Return

Use last year’s tax return as a starting point to create your checklist.  Although you may have new sources of income or different deductible expenses for the current year, this is usually a fairly comprehensive list of needed documents such as Form 1099 or 1098.  It will also serve as a reminder of information you may need to determine from bank statements or receipts such as medical expenses.

Sources of Income

This category generally includes wages, dividends, interest, partnership distributions, retirement and rental income.  You may receive a Form W-2, 1099, or K1 that indicates the amount of income reported to the IRS.  For other types of income, such as alimony received, you may need to determine the amount to report from bank statements.

Adjustments to Income

These are direct reductions to taxable income that commonly include deductible IRA contributions, alimony paid, Health Savings Account (HSA) contributions, SEP, SIMPLE or other self-employed pension plan contributions,  and self-employed health insurance payment records.

Deductible Expenses

If you itemize deductions rather than taking the standard deduction, you may need to collect source documents indicating the amount of mortgage interest paid (Form 1098), real estate and personal property taxes paid, medical expenses, and charitable contributions to be reported on Schedule A.

Tax Credits

Tax credits are a direct reduction of your tax bill so take a few minutes to research available 2017 credits.  You may be able to claim the American Opportunity Credit if you have a child in college or a Residential Energy Credit if you have made any “green” home improvements.

Basis of Property

This is also a good time to review and update the basis of property if necessary.  Home improvements made during the year may have increased the basis so collect and file those valuable receipts.

Taxes Paid

Federal and state taxes you have already paid may be found on your W-2 but if you pay quarterly estimated taxes you may need to collect records of payment.

While this is not a comprehensive list of every possible tax document needed to complete a tax return, it is a starting point from which you can develop your own, one that reflects your unique life circumstances.  Start organizing now and maybe tax season won’t be your least favorite season of the year.

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Nancy Blackman – Portfolio Manager
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2016 IRA Contribution Rules

The deadline to make IRA contributions for tax year 2016 is April, 18 2017. The maximum contribution is $5,500 per individual ($6,500 if age 50 or over) or 100 percent of earned income, whichever is less.

There are income limits which determine whether you can deduct your Traditional IRA contribution or if you qualify to make a Roth contribution. The following table gives the phase-out range for the most common circumstances.

Do you qualify to deduct your Traditional IRA contribution?
If your income is less than the beginning of the phase-out range, you qualify. If your income is over the phase-out range, you do not. If your income falls inside the range, you partially qualify.

Modified Adjusted Gross Income Phase-Out Range
Tax Filing Status For 2016 Contributions For 2017 Contributions
Single, participates in an employer-sponsored retirement plan: $61,000 – $71,000 $62,000 – $72,000
Married filing jointly, participates in an employer-sponsored retirement plan: $98,000 – $118,000 $99,000 – $119,000
Married filing jointly, your spouse participates in an employer-sponsored retirement plan, but you do not: $184,000 – $194,000 $186,000 – $196,000

Do you qualify to contribute to a Roth IRA?

Modified Adjusted Gross Income Phase-Out Range – Roth
Tax Filing Status For 2016 Contributions For 2017 Contributions
Single: $117,000-$132,000 $118,000-$132,999
Married, filing jointly: $184,000-$194,000 $186,000-$195,999

If your filing status differs from those listed above, please contact your advisor and he or she can help you determine whether you qualify.

Harli Palme, CFA, CFP®
Partner

Harli Palme

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