Does Jiro Dream of Retirement Too?

I recently moved to the Asheville area after living in Atlanta for twelve years. Ironically, the seeds of my move started around the time I purchased my very first home in Brookhaven, a charming neighborhood in Atlanta. I say ironically because for the prior ten years I held a fairly good and financially stable job, yet had never considered buying a house. Why not you ask? Well, I wasn’t sure myself until last week when I watched the documentary, “Jiro Dreams of Sushi” – which, by the way, I highly recommend.

Jiro is a world-renowned – – perhaps the world-renowned – – sushi chef, operating a tiny ten-seat restaurant inside one of Tokyo’s hundreds of subway stations. Jiro seemed to have no worries about money as far as I could tell, and at age ninety-something, he wasn’t quite ready to retire either. Something about Jiro, his perspective on- and relationship to his work prompted questions within me, questions about my own career, my relationship to my work, and my dreams for the future. Because as far as I can tell, most of us, myself included, work and save, plan and invest, with the hope and dream of one day retiring so that we no longer have to work. But in Jiro’s case, his work was his dream. It was one and the same. Which really hit a nerve in me and at the same time provided some clarity.

What I realized was that for the ten years prior to buying my first house, despite having a good job that would allow me to do it, my dreams and plans for my future life did not involve doing the work I was doing at the time. Meaning, I was not fully engaged in my career or my life and as a result I was often on the lookout for an escape route – and buying a house would have been a major impediment to escape. The job was a good one, interesting enough, and certainly gave me financial stability, but I believed happiness lived in some other job, at some other firm, pursuing some other career. I became so hungry for change that in 2008 I actually quit my job and moved to France for nine months. Interestingly enough, despite a fantastic, and in many ways, unexpected trip, I came home to find myself in almost exactly the same place. I say almost because while the circumstances, people, and places looked about the same, my perspective had changed.

I returned to my old job, worked with the “old” coworkers, and rented another apartment in the same old city. But having lived across the pond, having had the experiences I had, and having returned, I saw in the end that there actually was no escape. Good news really, because before France I planned and saved my money to escape my life, but after France I planned and saved my money to live more deeply into my life. As a result of this small shift, life and I were much more on the same page. It was in the midst of this shift that I started taking a deeper interest in my work as a financial analyst. I became more curious and engaged, and in turn the work itself grew more engaging and satisfying. A virtuous cycle had begun and continues today. It was when I finally stepped into my life and stopped trying to escape it that a new life, as such, presented itself. Just a year and half after purchasing my first house in Atlanta, a new and exciting career and life opportunity presented itself, and in my dream-city (Asheville), no less.

All this to say, that while planning for retirement, setting goals, and making smart choices are hugely important and necessary components of a satisfying and rewarding retirement, so too is engaging with our current circumstances, in our current jobs, and in our current lives, just as they are today. Thanks Jiro.

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