A Little Contrarianism Can Be a Good Thing

In our most recent quarterly letter, we reiterated our belief that you should allocate 15-25 percent of your equities portfolio to international stocks. Some of our clients still question the logic of this position in light of the ongoing EU crisis. However, let me make a case for contrarianism.

While the pall hanging over Europe has worsened in the last few years, things have not been rosy for a long time. According to June 2, 2012 article published by The Economist (http://www.economist.com/node/21556299 ):

Robert Buckland, an equity strategist at Citigroup, points out that about 44% of pan-European corporate profits are generated outside Europe (British companies earn 52% of their profits outside the continent). Around 24% of European profits come from emerging markets, roughly double the exposure of American companies to the developing world.

This diversification is not a coincidence. European companies have already endured a decade of sluggish growth and have sought out markets elsewhere (for production as well as sales).”

This indicates that worsening conditions in Europe will compel European companies to expand even further into the global economy. And, our dividend yield loving clients have another good reason not to flee European investments. While the average dividend yield for American markets is 2.2%, European markets are yielding 4.1%.

Beyond Europe, emerging markets continue to provide opportunities for investment. Mongolia is enjoying a rapidly expanding economy thanks to a boom in coal and copper mining. The Arab spring has led some analysts to predict major growth in Libya. A return to oil production and distribution is giving Iraq’s economy a much needed shot in the arm. Additionally, economists see much opportunity for growth in Africa, with several countries expected to post growth rates in excess of 7.5%.

I am not suggesting that European markets have hit bottom or that you should put all of your international investment dollars in emerging markets. What I do espouse is that a well diversified portfolio for the long-term investor has some exposure to international equities, even when the headlines indicate otherwise.

Tracy H. Allen, CFP®

Financial Advisor

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