Ikaria or Bust

Last fall I read a fascinating article in the New York Times Sunday Magazine entitled “The Island Where People Forget to Die.”  The article is about the nonagenarians and centenarians of Ikaria, a rugged and remote Greek island in the Northern Aegean.  It explores the possible factors that allow these people to lead longer, healthier lives.   

Dan Buettner, the article’s author, opens with the story of Stamatis Moraitis, a Greek war veteran who had settled in Port Jefferson, NY after the war.  Moraitis claimed that in 1976, he was diagnosed with lung cancer.  He considered going through chemotherapy, but elected instead to return to his homeland and spend his last days in the village of his childhood.  At first, he spent his days in bed being tended to by his elderly mother and his wife.  When childhood friends heard he was back, they paid daily visits, often bringing a bottle of wine to share.  Soon, he was working in the garden and making the walk up the hill to church.  He woke when he wanted, worked in the vineyard, had lunch, took a long nap.  Evenings were spent with family and friends.   Today, he is over 97 years old.  Is this all true?  I don’t know, but Moraitis is 97 and healthy and loving life!

Buettner spent five years studying the lives and habits of the people of Ikaria.  Working with his partner, a demographer from Belgium, they verified that Ikariotes reach the age of 90 at two and a half times the rate of Americans and they are often healthier.  More impressive is the fact that Ikariotes live 8 to 10 years longer than Americans before succumbing to cancer, heart disease, dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

So, what did Buettner uncover in his study on the centenarians of Ikaria?  In addition to the Mediterranean diet focusing fresh vegetables and fruit, yogurt, olive oil and red wine, Ikariotes are very communal and they spend many hours a day socializing with their fellow villagers.     They don’t drive, so walking is their form of exercise.  They nap every day and attend church every Sunday.  And reportedly, a healthy sex life is enjoyed by more than 80% of Ikairote men over 65.

I just returned from a Retirement Income Summit where the overriding theme was how to prepare our clients for the cost of health care in their retirement.  In my last post http://parsecfinancial.wordpress.com/2013/04/10/remember-wear-sunscreen/, I touched on this topic.

What has become abundantly clear is that it is imperative that we focus as much attention on leading healthy, active and productive lives as we spend on saving for a comfortable retirement.

While I don’t expect I will pack up everything and move to Greece, I think I could certainly find a way to incorporate many of the Ikariote habits into my daily life…now, I just need to find a way to sneak in that nap!

Tracy Allen, CFP®
Financial Advisor

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